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Issue 13.09 - September 2005
Subscribe to WIRED magazine and receive a FREE gift!

On the Internet, Nobody Knows You're a Bot
In the booming world of online poker, anyone can win. Especially with an autoplaying robot ace in the hole. Are you in, human?
By David KushnerPage 1 of 2 next »
 
It's late one Wednesday afternoon, and CptPokr is logged on to PartyPoker.com and ready to play. Onscreen, the captain exudes a certain brash charisma - broad shoulders, immaculate brown hair, restless animatronic eyes. He looks like he should be playing synth in Kraftwerk. Instead, he is seated at a virtual table with nine other avatars, wagering on limit Texas hold 'em.
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There's plenty at stake. An estimated 1.8 million gamblers around the world ante up for online poker every month. Last year, poker sites raked in an estimated $1.4 billion, an amount expected to double in 2005.
Ever since the aptly named accountant Chris Moneymaker parlayed a $40 Internet tournament buy-in into a $2.5 million championship at the World Series of Poker in 2003, card shark wannabes have been chasing their fantasies onto the Net. Some even quit their day jobs and try to make a living at online poker. And why not? This shadowy world is driven by no less a force than the great American dream. As the tournament's motto goes, "Anyone can win." There's one problem, though, as CptPokr is about to demonstrate: The rules of the game are different online.
CptPokr is a robot. Unlike the other icons at the table, there is no human placing his bets and playing his cards. He is controlled by WinHoldEm, the first commercially available autoplaying poker software. Seat him at the table and he will apply strategy gleaned from decades of research. While carbon-based players munch Ding Dongs, yawn, guzzle beer, reply to email, take phone calls, and chat on IM, CptPokr (a pseudonym) is running the numbers so it will know, statistically, when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em.
Smart, skilled players are rewarded in the long run, especially online, where there are plenty of beginners who would never have the nerve to sit down at a real table. But WinHoldEm isn't just smart, it's a machine. Set it to run on autopilot and it wins real money while you sleep. Flick on Team mode and you can collude with other humans running WinHoldEm at the table.
For years, there has been chatter among online players about the coming poker bot infestation. WinHoldEm is turning those rumours into reality, and that is a serious problem for the online gambling business. Players come online seeking a "fair" shot - a contest against other humans, not robots. But an invasion of bots implies a fixed game (even though, like their mortal counterparts, they can and do lose if their hands are bad enough or opponents good enough). So the poker sites loudly proclaim that automated play is no big deal. At the same time, they are fighting back by quietly scanning for and eliminating suspicious accounts. "We're making sure we never have bots on our site," says PartyPoker marketing director Vikrant Bhargava.
That's an impossible promise to keep, says Ray E. Bornert II, WinHoldEm's elusive creator. He's trying to flood the online world with his bot - and make a killing in the process. Bornert offers an elaborate justification for what many view as outright cheating: Online poker is already rife with computer-assisted card sharks and - thanks to him - a growing number of outright bots. Players should get wise and arm themselves with the best bot available, which is, of course, WinHoldEm.
There's a quiet knock at the door of a hotel room in Atlanta. It's Bornert. A stocky, wide-faced 43-year-old with a neat goatee and nervous manner, he's carrying a router in a plastic bag. To demonstrate his software, he insists on meeting here in private, several miles from his office. He doesn't want anyone from the poker business to know where he is. "Our guard is constantly up," he says.
For Bornert, a former evangelical student, outsmarting the poker sites is not just a mission, it's a market. A suite of WinHoldEm programs is available for download at www.winholdem.net. For $25, you get a bare-bones setup: run-of-the-mill poker-hand analysis software. For $200, you can buy the full package: a one-year subscription to the team edition, which includes the autoplaying bot and a card-sharing module that allows multiple players to communicate during a game. Bornert won't say how many customers he has; he'll admit only that he makes a living selling WinHoldEm.
For customers, buying the bot is just a starting point. The program works something like a music equalizer, but instead of adjusting bass and treble, you tweak betting strategies - how to play a pair of fives early in the game, for example, or when to fold cards that might look promising to a beginner. Most users customize the software by inputting a batch of rules, called a formula set. Bot aficionados scour poker manuals and online forums to cull the best strategies. They swap formula sets like gamers swap mods. "This is from Sklansky's Tournament Poker for Advanced Players, pages 122-133," reads a typical note posted to the WinHoldEm forums.
Bornert isn't claiming he can create millionaires. Bots are subject to the same cold streaks as real players. But, unlike humans, the machines play with relentless cunning and tireless discipline, raking in small pots from low-limit tables where less-experienced opponents hang out. Traditionalists in the poker chat rooms scorn Bornert. "You are a pathetic immoral piece of shit loser," reads a recent post, "completely devoid of morals and ethics."
He hardly cares. Bornert insists that he's bringing to light the hypocrisy of the gambling sites. It's an unlikely role for a guy who grew up in Dallas and Phoenix as a self-described "geek jock" playing football and studying biblical history. "I'd always been taught gambling was evil," he says. He went on to Oral Roberts University, where he became fascinated with cards after seeing a late-night infomercial for a blackjack scheme.
Bornert was pursuing a degree in computer science, and the ad intrigued him. He set up some simulations to test the card-counting technique and found that a player could, in fact, get the edge. That's when a light went on: Blackjack wasn't really gambling after all. With enough smarts, a player could master it and win. "No one could say I was addicted to a losing game," Bornert says. "It was beatable." After seven consecutive profitable trips to Vegas, Bornert got hooked on winning.

As the poker boom hit the Net, Bornert found himself working for the house. He took a job as a senior systems engineer with RealTime Gaming, an Atlanta-based developer of online casino software. While working on blackjack software in 2001, he started tinkering with his own card-analysis software on the side. Such programs - Poker Tracker, Poker Edge, Holdem Winner - have since become an acceptable and indispensable part of the scene. They're used like calculators to keep tabs on shifting stats. It didn't take long for Bornert to make the next logical connection - what he calls the "golden goose" of online poker. Rather than consult card-analysis software while playing, why not hook up the software directly to the game?
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Bornert had no ethical qualms about creating a poker bot. The way he saw it, the poker sites were duping people into believing that a game of hold 'em online was as safe and secure as one at any casino in Vegas. "The reality is that the game changed the moment it moved to the Internet," Bornert says. Bots and bot-aided collusion were inevitable. Rather than seduce anyone into thinking such things didn't exist, Bornert had another notion: Put the power in the players' hands. By democratizing computer-assisted firepower, he'd make it part of the competition. "It's like football - if you don't wear a helmet and pads, you're going to get hurt," he says. "A poker bot is your equipment." And if that is considered unethical, then so be it. "I'd rather be unethical than be a victim," he says. "This is intentional civil disobedience."
In 2003, Bornert quit his job at RealTime Gaming and devoted himself to writing WinHoldEm. He quickly had a working prototype, which serves as the template for the bot he sells today. When a user boots up the software and logs on for a game, all the players' cards and chips are represented onscreen. WinHoldEm first scans the screen for information. The data is put into memory and analyzed according to the player's formula set. Each action - calling, raising, going all-in - is controlled by a series of yes-no formulas.
By fall, Bornert was ready to test his software. He logged on to a $5-limit hold 'em tournament on Paradise Poker and watched the program go. A crucial element of the test was to see how long the application could stay online without being detected. Eventually, Bornert went to bed - but the bot didn't. The next morning when he checked his computer, WinHoldEm had won. It wasn't a lot of money, only $30, but it proved a point. "I almost shed tears," he recalls. "I know what Dr. Frankenstein felt like. It was a totally intoxicating experience."
On Super Bowl Sunday 2004, Bornert began offering his program online. It didn't take long for the poker sites to catch on and fight back. Within weeks, they were scanning games to see if anyone was running WinHoldEm, and users were getting booted off poker sites before they could cash out. "Players no longer feel comfortable if they think they're playing a computer," says Scott Wilson, director of operations for Paradise Poker. "You would lose credibility fast if they felt your environment wasn't human-to-human."
Players themselves also took steps against the bots, using a site's chat function to smoke out the software. Moneymaker likes to engage players in small talk between hands. "Poker bots can't make conversation," he says. Meanwhile, bot users started developing their own counter-countermeasures, like limiting their time at any one table to minimize the appearance that a relentless machine is involved. And they can control their bots from a remote computer to evade detection by poker sites that scan for WinHoldEm on a hard drive.
The battle goes beyond Bornert's app. Other bots are appearing on the scene - including some that were never intended for online play. For the past 14 years, computer scientists at the University of Alberta Games Group have been building the poker version of Deep Blue: a program that can beat a top player, just as IBM's bot trumped Garry Kasparov in chess. "I'd love to be there when the computer raises the stakes by $100,000," says UA's Jonathan Schaeffer. "I want to see the bead of perspiration going down the human opponent's forehead. That's my dream."
There's reason to sweat even now. Not because Schaeffer's bot is taking on world champs - that's a few years off - but because bits of the underlying UA code have escaped into the wild. Schaeffer licensed his team's software to the makers of applications like Poker Academy, which trains players in the game's finer points. But hackers have extracted the underlying code and are putting it to use in their poker bots.
Poker site operators say there's nothing to worry about, and for them there isn't. For now, sites continue to earn healthy profits because they make money by taking a percentage - the "rake" - of every pot. "If anyone's losing money because of the bots, it's the players," says Poker Academy CEO Kurt Lange. "It's inevitably going to become a serious problem when they figure out that bots win hundreds of thousands of dollars per year." Indeed, PartyPoker reportedly has 100 employees scanning for the presence of bots.
PartyPoker's Bhargava insists that the game is still fair. "There are people who spend all their waking hours dreaming about how to bring us down," he says. "They can dream about creating fantasy bots that will play for them or make them money while they sleep, but that's not going to happen."
"All right, we're on!" says Bornert, as the two laptops in the hotel room fire up WinHoldEm and join a game of Texas hold 'em on none other than PartyPoker. "Awesome!"
As the bot folds onscreen, Bornert leans back in his chair and soaks it in. Though he's watched this scene countless times, he's still impressed with his own technology. He imagines a day when sites acknowledge the presence of bots and when players embrace them as part of the action. But this won't happen, he says, until players take up the cause. "You've been woken up," he says, as the bot rakes in its chips. "Now what are you going to do?" Bornert hopes they reach the obvious conclusion: Use a bot, too.
David Kushner ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) is the author of Jonny Magic and the Card Shark Kids.
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Designing a Robot to Beat Blackjack
8 March 2004

By John May
<a href='http://as1.casinocity.com/www/delivery/ck.php?n=aae8c64d&cb=0.631424346987' target='_blank'><img src='http://as1.casinocity.com/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=4&cb=0.631424346987&n=aae8c64d' border='0' alt='' /></a>
If there is one thing online casinos fear more than any other it is a blackjack robot player, a computer program designed to play blackjack perfectly and tirelessly. Simply mirroring a robot's tireless playing patterns is enough to get your account frozen and your winnings confiscated from some casinos who offer blackjack games that can theoretically be beaten by card counting.
They shouldn't worry. If I were running an online casino, I'd welcome play by blackjack robots. Hell, I'd have a competition to see who could design the best one. Programming a computer to play perfectly is quite easy. I could do it, and I'm no great shakes as a programmer. The difficulty comes with the "broken biscuit" principle. Programming a computer to recognize a biscuit is easy. It can just look at the shape and check it with its memory banks for a correlation with the known shape of a biscuit. If the biscuit is broken, however, the robot struggles. Unlike a human it can't process the colour, texture and smell of the biscuit to determine it is one.
The same problem occurs with card recognition. Explaining what a card is to a blackjack computer given the myriad number of possible designs is not easy. There is no margin of error here. If a computer thinks a 4 is an ace or vice versa it will blow your bankroll in minutes.
If I were running a casino, I could create the perfect countermeasure by designing the software to periodically alter the card design in some unnoticeable way every now and again. The human player wouldn't even notice but the computer would be hopelessly confused. To some extent this happens anyway because of small problems with PC display systems and internet transmission difficulties. Has your screen ever gone a funny colour when your computer crashed a program?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poker Bots
You either love em or you hate em. But lets face it, they are not gonna go away just yet. In fact they are getting better all the time. Just click on the links on the right if you want to review any or all of them. As they become available, we will do our best to find them and review them here. So why not pop back here from time to time, and catch up with the latest.
What Is a Poker Bot
A Poker bot, or Poker Robot, is a program or piece of software that is normally hooked up to an Online Poker Site, and makes decisions about the current hand that is being played, and acts accordingly (Bets, Folds, Raises etc), just as if you were playing the hand yourself.
I am sure a lot of you are at least curious about the latest craze in poker. We are of course referring to poker bots. Review and try
Before we start. We would like to make our position here at .Com perfectly clear with regards to Poker Bots, Poker Robots, or whatever else you would like to call them. We do not, and will not, condone any form of cheating whatsoever.
Winholdem
So, while we are on the subject of cheating, let us cover the first bot, that does exactly that. Now I am sure a few of you will already know the name of the program I'm talking about. "Winholdem". we will not endorse the use of it in any way. What this software allows you to do that we find so repulsive, is that it allows its owner to collude with other players online who are also in possession of this piece of kit. In other words, they disclose each other's cards. For those of you who do find the idea of cheating attractive, and are maybe tempted to rush off and obtain it from site, here are a few words of wisdom. You will not be purchasing an out of the box bot. You'll have to program it yourself, and will have to have a very good knowledge of C to do so. If you have this knowledge, you will have to spend hundreds if not thousands of hours trying to produce a workable bot. And all this for a bargain price of $200 PER ANNUM.
Online Pokibot
Well what has this to do with online poker bots? you may ask. The answer is that someone has attempted to make a program that allows these bots to be used online. and they call it, "Online Pokibot". Now I used the word attempted, because it is full of bugs and basically doesn't work. And for this piece of rubbish, you pay a whooping annual fee.
It all sounds very expensive, does it not? Well if you will keep reading a little longer we have a pleasant surprise for you.
BE WARNED! The support at this site will not reply to any of your e-mails when you query the many problems you will encounter. Neither will you receive a refund

 

 
 
 
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Your next poker partner may be software
Last updated 00:00 14/11/2007
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KNOW WHEN TO HOLD 'EM: Online poker is under threat from people developing sophisticated computer programs that can easily outplay the best players.
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The lucrative world of online poker has been put on notice as researchers edge closer to developing software that can outplay even the most skilful humans.
The research poses a significant threat to the multi-billion dollar online poker industry and players, who down the track risk being fleeced by legions of robot-aided scammers.
Computer programs can already beat most humans at checkers, backgammon, scrabble, bridge and connect four.
A decade ago, an IBM super computer famously beat the former World Chess Champion, Garry Kasparov, in a six-game duel.
But the huge amount of money changing hands in online poker games - $US60 billion ($NZ79 billion) in 2005, according to some estimates - gives hackers a particular incentive to cheat the system.
In an opinion column for The New York Times, Ian Ayres, an economist and lawyer at Yale, said that, in the very near future, "online poker may become a suckers' game that humans won't have a chance to win".
In July this year, two of the world's best poker players only narrowly beat a computer program at Texas Hold 'Em during the first Man-Machine Poker Championship in Vancouver, Canada.
The program, Polaris, was developed over 16 years by the computer poker research group at the University of Alberta. It incorporates a number of fixed strategies but can also adapt based on moves and mistakes made by the opponent.
"We won, not by a significant amount, and the bots are closing in," one of the world champion players, Phil Laak, told The Guardian after the match.
Other poker-playing computer bots, such as Bluffbot and WinHoldem, can already be downloaded from the internet but their accuracy and effectiveness when put up against the world's best players has been questioned.
Professor Jonathan Schaeffer, who co-founded the Alberta university's poker research group, said the team was already working on programs that could take on multiple players in both limit and no-limit games.
His group had already "solved" checkers earlier this year, developing a computer program that knew the best move to make in any possible position.
"All games lead to a draw, unless one side makes a mistake," Dr Schaeffer said.
Polaris is today only strong at two-player Texas Hold 'Em games that have a limit on the amount players can bet.
"Building a program that plays on par with the top human players in this domain is something that will happen fairly soon, perhaps even next year," he said.
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The goal of the poker research group, as outlined on its website, is to "produce a poker program that is stronger than all human players".
But despite the rapid progress, Dr Schaeffer stressed it could be a while before computer programs could seriously challenge the top humans in no-limit games and games with three or more people at a table.
He denied the university's research posed a significant threat to online poker sites, saying the sites would "do everything in their power" to block players from using software programs to play for them.
"All these sites have programs that look for evidence that a computer is playing instead of a human," Dr Schaeffer.
But Dr Ayres said computer bots such as Polaris were "quite-scaleable", and it would be virtually impossible to prohibit computer-assisted playing.
He said bots could randomise their moves to make them harder to detect.
Australian laws prohibit companies from offering online casino-style gambling services here, but the laws have done nothing to stop swarms of Australians from betting through sites based overseas. This year, an employee of one site, AbsolutePoker.com, was caught cheating.
- Sydney Morning Herald                            Technology Homepage
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Blackjack Bots
Several casino players who play blackjack online fear that they might be playing against a blackjack bot or a robot which can steal their money. Blackjack Bots are basically software which can be used in order to read the cards which are on display at the online casinos. Using bots, the player can decide the best action for that hand.
These bots are definitely quite prevalent and are also used and designed by players quite often for cheating at blackjack. Like with any other type of software, bots would only be as useful as the intelligence with which they have been made.
What Can a Bot do?
1. A good bot in blackjack would work just like the brain of a skilled blackjack player. It would take the player's cards as an input would plug the cards in the matrix for the basic strategy and would then decide how to play those cards in the best possible way.
2. A good bot would also know when to split, double and hit. If the bot is really good it would be able to make totally error free decisions.
3. A good blackjack bot would be able to take the game structure for every online casino in account. The player can input the bet amounts, the dealer parameters and the number of decks which are used.
The basic strategy would be adjusted automatically to maximize the profits for that game. Basically, a player can just turn on the bot and go off to sleep while the bot would play the game for the player perfectly and would continue to make money.
Blackjack bots do exist and they also work quite well. Lots of online players have figured out how to make blackjack bots and are also using it to make money at online casinos.

 

 

 


 
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Video-poker bots collaborate through back-channels
BY CORY DOCTOROW AT 8:08 AM THURSDAY, SEP 1
There's a fascinating piece in this month's Wired about a pokerbot called WinHoldEm, a commercial app that automatically plays through hand after hand of video poker, adhering to a strict system and even opening a back-channel to other WinHoldEm bots in the game to collude to bilk the human players out of their bets:
For years, there has been chatter among online players about the coming poker bot infestation. WinHoldEm is turning those rumours into reality, and that is a serious problem for the online gambling business. Players come online seeking a "fair" shot - a contest against other humans, not robots. But an invasion of bots implies a fixed game (even though, like their mortal counterparts, they can and do lose if their hands are bad enough or opponents good enough). So the poker sites loudly proclaim that automated play is no big deal. At the same time, they are fighting back by quietly scanning for and eliminating suspicious accounts. "We're making sure we never have bots on our site," says PartyPoker marketing director Vikrant Bhargava.
That's an impossible promise to keep, says Ray E. Bornert II, WinHoldEm's elusive creator. He's trying to flood the online world with his bot - and make a killing in the process. Bornert offers an elaborate justification for what many view as outright cheating: Online poker is already rife with computer-assisted card sharks and - thanks to him - a growing number of outright bots. Players should get wise and arm themselves with the best bot available, which is, of course, WinHoldEm
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A Poker bot, or Poker Robot, was programmed to do all the earning and playing for the programmer, they are hooked up to an Online Poker Site, and makes decisions about the current hand that is being played, and acts accordingly as if you were the one making all the decisions yourself. They seem to be all over the internet and taking over the internet casinos by the storms. Here is a little more information about different types of poker bots. Apparently they come programmed for different types of card games and tables.
The Shaky bots are near out of the box products open the box, tweak a few modifications to your playing preference and than they are on the loose winning you money while you sit back and watch. If you want something that is a little less cookie cutter; you may want to try a third party software program, like Online Poker Inspector, affectionately known as "OPI" among poker bot enthusiasts. The problem with these programs is that the decision-programming is limited to what these 3rd party software programs are capable of, so they are markedly inferior to a bot that was programmed up from scratch by a top player.
If you are one of the few out there who are already programmers, you will be happy with Win Holdem, a platform with a reworking bot which requires C/C++ programming knowledge. This allows you to do some custom work under the hood first. Although this is the more challenging of the options, you will have a great piece of work to put to the test when you are complete, and will have a great product to show off at the tables.
There are different levels of poker bots out there and it seems there are some sites that are a little less than honest or rewarding to go with. Stay away from any site that offers free bots, in exchange for their offers or services. Often times, these are not legitimate sites. And are scam artists. Online you can find several different places to download them and they do not require any programming at all. Entering a little information about the kind of poker bot you are going to use, than you are off, and playing. Or rather, your poker bot is. There are different programs for each table, and each and every type of poker game out there. Running a search engine on poker robots will give you a better idea of how many people are already taking advantage of this new and upcoming trend. You will not be the only person with a poker bot at your seat.
The purpose of the poker bot is to increase revenue and winnings without you having to physically be sitting at a poker table and playing the hands yourself. It allows you to dominate the power play of the game, and the tables. This has advantages and disadvantages. It is wise, and suggestive that you do plenty of research on any programming you are considering using, and only use trustworthy sites. And play smart.

Published by Marlo Colston
My husband and 6 children and myself live in Missouri. Our Children range from high school down to one still at home. We belong to a family church called Family Life Fellowship, my husband works for the Sher... View profile
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There is a new menace for the online casinos, they are called blackjack robots.
Unlike online poker where you are playing against other members of the public, with online blackjack you are playing usually against the dealer (or casino) Some blackjack robots are automatic and play the game for you. These are programmed to play the percentages and play a good game for you. The only problem I could see with these robot are you still in the hands of fate, you could walk away from the table leaving your blackjack robot to play and come back and you have lost everything! Unlike some poker robot which when running is playing against other humans. The blackjack robot is playing against the casinos blackjack dealers, which is in fact a computer program, who are programmed to make sure it comes out on top. I am not saying blackjack robots cannot win, just it is not in their hands.
There are different blackjack robot software’s out there on the market. As mentioned some play the game for you, some work out the percentages on each hand and calculate the percentage play. There is one out  there that is not really as blackjack robot, unlike the auto robots you still have to play the game for yourself, the (big) difference is it talks to you, telling you what the outcome of that game will be (win or lose) before the hand is dealt!
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The advantage of this software is that it can maximise your winnings and reduce your losses to the bare minimum. It is called read and voice blackjack software.
When we ran a test, it worked well (but only for 15 Min’s or so, as it has a time limiter to stop overuse) The test showed it wins on average six time the starting pot within the  time they allow you to use the software per day. (i.e.: £100 start of bank equates to £700, leaving approx £600 profit) It is very simple software to use.  The developers say that the software can be used at any blackjack table and is 100% undetectable, safe and legal. How do they do it? Well there not going to tell us, there are all sort of theories how they have cracked this tables. One that they have inside knowledge on how these casino programs work and how to break the code sent from the casino to the laptop, thus allowing their software to know the outcome before hand? To be honest it is all above our heads!
 
 

Yes this software does have a lot going for it, but also a big minus as far as we can see. What if you win too much too often? You account would be suspended and you would end up with nothing. Then the end game would be like some poker robot users who were too greedy and ended up with nothing. You would have to be very much disciplined with this software, varying your daily amounts, playing different sites and even making sure you lose on occasions. I suspect that this software will not be cheap to buy, but at least it works. They also have a very basic demo film of this software in action.
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Everyone probably played blackjack as a kid as it is quick to pick up, you may know it as 21s. There are a couple of good blackjack books to read, one by Don Schlesinger is called “Blackjack attack – play the pro’s way” “Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M.I.T. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions” is the story of how the M.I.T team used card counting to make millions, the author is Ben Hezrich and is a good read. How long before blackjack robots are as big as poker robots, I suspect sooner rather than later?
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johnnyawe
 09-20-2004, 08:46 PM Post subject: winholdem poker bot  #1 (permalink)


 
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 There is this program called winholdem.

Two features intrigued/alarmed me:

1) Auto-play

"WH has the ability to play Hold'Em for you and in fact it probably plays Hold'Em better than you."

2) Card sharing:

"One of the most exciting WH features is the ability to easily and conveniently share your cards with a fellow friend playing Hold'Em at the same online poker casino table."


Any thoughts on the prevelance of software like this and whether it poses a threat to the integrity of the online game? Any thoughts on how well the autoplay feature would work? Do you think anybody uses these features? Do you think people could make a profit by using autoplay? Is there any way to determine if somebody is using autoplay and if so could you easily defeat it?
 
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Deadmoney
 09-20-2004, 11:14 PM  #2 (permalink)

 

Join Date: Sep 2004
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 Wow...

I don't know if/how well it would work, but that's just wrong IMO. I can understand cheats for video games and such, but people play online poker with their own hard-earned money, and putting anyone at an unfair disadvantage like that (if the program is as good as they say it is) is no better than walking up to them on the street and stealing their wallet.

The people that wrote that program, and anyone who uses it to turn a profit, should be ashamed of themselves.
 
mpqz
 09-21-2004, 08:05 AM  #3 (permalink)

 

Join Date: Aug 2004
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 It sounds like the program just calculates your outs, the pot size, and figures out the best +EV play, and executes it... (I didn't read about it yet)

I think this is dangerous (in limit games) but not a real threat. It would be no different than playing someone who is really a great player (always making +EV moves, because he's looking to win in the long run).

It's unfair yes (bots don't go on tilt and they can multi-table 24/7 without ever stopping), but what can you do about it?

If party poker (using them as an example here) finds a way to detect it, surely the authors of this program (or anyone else who writes a program to do the same thing) will update their bot to counter act PP's detection.

That process would continue constantly, with no winner.

With people playing overseas with overseas transactions, I'm not sure if PP can do anything legally to stop each abusive user (I haven't read their TOS).
 
elipsesjeff
 09-21-2004, 05:14 PM  #4 (permalink)

 

 

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By Mike BrunkerProjects Team editor
msnbc.com
updated 9/21/2004 11:35:31 PM ET
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Pull up a chair at a friendly poker game in a buddy’s den and you probably know the other players and have some idea of their card-playing weaknesses – like Big Al's habit of fingering his chips when he's itching to raise. But take a seat at a table in one of the rapidly multiplying online card rooms and there's no telling who’s sitting to your right – or if the player is even human.
Concern is growing in online chat rooms and news groups devoted to poker that sophisticated card-playing robots – known as “bots” in the nomenclature of the Web – are being used on commercial gambling sites to fleece newcomers, the strategy-impaired and maybe even above-average players.
“It is pretty much a certainty that bots are playing online,” said Gautam Rao, a 43-year-old Canadian poker pro who regularly plays three high-stakes Internet games simultaneously. “… What we don’t know is how strong they are.”
Widespread use of bots capable of beating your average player would pose a significant problem for the red-hot online poker sector, which has grown exponentially in recent years and is expected to top the $1 billion revenue mark this year. Without some way of verifying the identity – and humanity – of players, the business could be significantly undercut.
Many don't see a threat
But skeptics – and there are many – argue the complexities of the game and the changing strategies ensure that creation of a program that can “read” opponents’ cards using screen scanning techniques and respond in real time is years away at best. They point to the handful of commercial products that purport to give online players significant advantage, which they roundly deride as woefully inadequate, as proof today's bots are no match for humans.
Rao and his fellow believers have a ready answer: A bot capable of playing against the best humans already exists.
The University of Alberta’s Computer Poker Research Group has developed an artificially intelligent automaton known as “Vex Bot,” capable of playing poker at the master level, though as yet it can only apply its gambling genius to two-player games. Vex Bot has been used by researchers to test the frontiers of artificial intelligence – and as the basis for a commercial poker tutorial program, Poki’s Poker Academy -- but some fear it may become a blueprint for programmers with more sinister motives.

 

Darse Billings, lead designer of the Vex Bot said he believes the odds are better than 50-50 that other programmers have secretly unleashed bots on commercial poker sites, apart from the commercial bots. But he throws his chips in with the skeptics, saying it is unlikely they would be anywhere near as capable as the Vex Bot – so named for its ability to frustrate human opponents – which is the result of more than a decade’s research by the University of Alberta team.
“The strategy of the game is difficult and to sit down and write a program that can beat a table of experienced human players is no trivial task,” he said.
While bots have been used to play the optimal strategy in other online card games, like blackjack, poker is a different animal. The biggest obstacles lie in the amount of information unavailable to the player and the need for the program to be able to employ a variety of strategies at different times, such as bluffing and laying traps for opponents, explained Billings, a doctoral student and master poker player.
‘A program that can think’
“With chess – I don’t want to trivialize it – but it’s just a matter of calculation,” he said. “With poker, you really need to write a program that can think about the game and reason.”
The solution, in the case of the Vex Bot, was adding a layer of artificial intelligence over its ability to calculate probabilities.
“It will show you things that no human player has ever shown you before,” Billings said of the latest incarnation of the bot, which also has the ability to model its opponent’s behaviour. “… One of the biggest advantages that programs have is that they have no fear, no shame. Humans can be intimidated. They will back off in the face of a very aggressive player. A bot will not. It has no compunction about doing whatever it will take to win. It will raise you with any two cards if it thinks that it has a very slight advantage based on your history. And it can induce a lot of anger and emotional upset. These things are ‘tilt monsters.’”
Rao, who served as one of the testers of Vex Bot, attests to its skills.
 
“It was a formidable foe,” he said of his initial encounter with the bot, before the addition of its new feature. “I can see that (the improved) bot, given enough hands, will become an absolute world beater.”
While the Vex Bot is undeniably at the head of its class, the mere existence of bots is a sensitive subject for operators of poker sites, all of which appear to have policies prohibiting their use.
“I can’t imagine that any good can come of this interview,” Bob Wolf of TiltWare LLC, a Los Angeles-based software developer that licenses its poker game to a company that operates the Fulltiltpoker.com site, wrote in rejecting to an interview request.
Operators of other poker sites and creators of poker software interviewed by MSNBC.com said they have been able to defeat bots by monitoring the sites for suspicious patterns of play and tweaking software to foil the commercial bots.
A game of cat and bot
“There are a few commercially available programs which people have tried to use,” said Vikrant Bhargava, general manager of Partypoker.com, the biggest poker site on the Internet. “We make a change and these guys again try to beat the system. With our last update, I believe we have rendered the commercially available bots useless.”
Bhargava, whose site hosts more than 50,000 players at upwards of 5,000 tables during peak hours, also said playing against the existing class of bots is an opportunity rather than a hazard.
 
"If I were a player I think I would like to play against a bot. … I would take the bot’s money.”
Nancy Chan-Palmateer, a spokeswoman for Canadian software maker CryptoLogic, which oversees the online card room used by its eight poker licensees on the Caribbean island of Curacao, said some players have been banned from the member sites for suspicious patterns of play that could indicate use of bots.
“Sometimes you don’t know if it’s specifically (bots) … but certainly we’ve blocked players that have shown unusual activity,” she said.
But Ray Bornert II, whose company makes WinHoldEm, billed as “a programmable pokerbot,” said his company developed a two-computer strategy to foil attempts to block its users.
Selective enforcement charged
Bornert criticized poker sites for singling out his firm’s products – which includes a “Team Edition” that allows players to see one another’s cards, in violation of rules against collusion -- while failing to ensure that others also are playing by the rules.
“We take issue with the poker sites because they do not do enough to communicate the fact that it is impossible to physically secure their no-bots, no-teams policies in an online environment,” he wrote in reply to an e-mail question. “... If the poker sites cannot physically secure their no-bots, no-teams policies then they need to cease their persecution of players who are resorting to such measures in order to adequately defend themselves against opponents that have already seen the light. Players should be free to fight fire with fire without being bullied by the poker rooms.”
Video: Poker 'bots' He also quarrelled with those who say the software is ineffective, maintaining that it increased its original bankroll by 35 percent in a five-day test in January in which it was used to play 7,000 hands. He acknowledged, though, that its ability to beat human players depends on the user’s skill in setting the formula that it uses to play.
Rao, the professional player, also expressed doubts about the poker sites’ professed zero tolerance of bots, though for a different reason. He said site operators make for bad cops when it comes to policing bots since they still collect the house “rake” – the percentage taken from each pot – whether the player is human or software.
“They’ll turn a blind eye as long as it’s trivial … as long as that bot pays its rake for every pot and as long as it doesn’t undermine the confidence (of the other players),” he said.
Proliferation of sites presents opportunity
Moreover, Rao said, the proliferation of poker sites presents an excellent opportunity for anyone with a bot that can eke out a slim profit to fly under the radar of those looking for unusual playing patterns.
“If you’ve got a bot that can play 25 casinos, two tables apiece, even if you’re playing a (mid-level) $10/$20 game … that’s $1,000 an hour,” he said.
And if such a bot is created, how long will its author be able to keep it secret?
“It’s only a matter of time before a talented poker player who also happens to be a good developer decides she or he wants to be remembered as the author of the first bot that changed online poker forever,” an author who goes by the screen name “loic” lamented recently in the Twoplustwo.com poker forum.
But Billings, creator of Vex Bot, expects online poker to continue to thrive in spite of efforts to develop the “killer bot.” In fact, he added, it may grow even faster.
“I don’t foresee a danger of bots killing the game in any sense,” he said. “More likely, there will be a large contribution of cash from people who try to create bots and fail.”
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We put poker bots to the test...
By This Is Money
Last updated at 11:57 AM on 4th March 2009
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COMPUTER programmers claim they can win every time at the online poker table by using robots - or bots - to play against humans. Could that be true? The Mail on Sunday's Live Night & Day decided there was only one way to really find out - and brought bot-runner 'Dave' into the office to show us.

 

He set up his two computers and had them wired together in about ten minutes. Then they simply crunched away. No fireworks, no razzmatazz; just the quiet, steady accumulation of cash. The program made £40 over the course of our office day.
Indeed, so conclusive are such demonstrations that even the most sceptical are fascinated. Darse Billings is the lead designer of the Computer Poker Research Group at the University of Alberta, and his team are designing programs to take on pros, much like Deep Blue took on chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov. Billings says, 'The WinHoldEm bot is basically doomed in any game where the players are really thinking properly. Fortunately at this point, it's a pretty small minority who actually are.

'There are lots of players new to the game who don't really have a clue what they are doing. They make a lot of errors very regularly, and they are not paying attention to the things that matter. They don't notice that someone has never bluffed or that another bluffs all the time. It's all the difference in the world - it's how you win at poker. So you only really have to play a simple system to win. It's why these bots can make steady money.'

So, if you can't beat them, should you join them? Sadly, while there might be thousands of bots playing online, it isn't an easy way to make a living. Poker bots such as WinHoldEm have a basic framework of poker information but require thousands of man-hours' worth of extra programming to make them viable. After that, you're left running what amounts to a giant scam. If you get caught, casinos can seize any of your profits they hold online and close your accounts.

'Graham' runs a high-level bot scam playing around 50 tables simultaneously with associates both in America and in mainland Europe. He claims to have achieved the Holy Grail of botrunners, combining bot software with commercially available programs that collect hand histories of every active player from poker sites all over the world. With this in place, he claims his syndicate will start testing the bot against intermediate players for higher stakes (you'd need about £3,000 to sit down and feel comfortable). Graham claims that bots are probably being used for money-laundering and that the only difficult part of his operation is providing each bot with a clean 'human' face.

'I got banned and had my funds taken when one of the biggest WinHoldEm botters in the world - a Vegas guy - got busted and it led back to me. He got lazy and had 50 accounts seized - enough money to buy a few new cars. The accounts were linked to bank details and then to another account that belonged to a pro poker player; I'd traded him an account of mine and the trail came back to me. Now I need two new identities to replace my bots. After the thousands of hours of programming and testing, I suppose this is the only hard part.'

In response to a request for an interview, John Shepherd, director of corporate communications for Party Poker, gave us a written statement instead. 'We have caught individual cheats and also groups of people who were colluding or using bots,' it reads. 'In all cases, we closed their accounts and seized their funds and barred them from our system. [But] by far the majority of our players prefer to use skill than make any attempt to cheat.'

But sadly for companies such as Party Poker, the story doesn't end there. Because it's not a case of bots or collusion; now you can do both - and when bots collude, they do so far more cleverly than humans. Programmers can seat multiple bots on the same tables and have them read each other's cards via a third-party server. 'It's the difference between going out shoplifting and doing an armed robbery,' says Dave.

This story first appeared in the Mail on Sunday's brilliant new magazine, Night & Day Live. To arrange home delivery of the paper visit www.mailonsunday.co.uk

Professional player and author David Sklansky is the world's foremost expert on poker - books such as The Theory Of Poker have made him a godlike figure to many bot programmers. He believes getting bots to collude is not only viable but a genuine threat to regular players.

'The biggest problem for card rooms is the bots that are programmed to collude. If you have two or three of your own bots in the same game, then besides playing the basic strategy, they will be able to play an improved strategy based on knowing each other's own cards, and will really cause the other players to struggle.

'If you had a game with three world champion players and three players at a lower individual level who were colluding (sharing cards and information), then all three world champions would eventually lose.'

Meanwhile, back in my study, I'm watching my bot crunch away. I see we have a strong - but not unbeatable - hand, a straight. Buttons flash, money moves into the pot. My opponent then raises to try and scare me out of the pot. But the bot will not be manoeuvred by petty psychology. It has considered all the possibilities the hand has to offer and how the opponent has bet so far, and raises back. And when the final card is turned over, the WinHoldEm calculations are proved correct. We've won. Platinum lightning flashes across the screen.

I should feel ashamed. I always believed there was honour and glory in taking down a pot, in reading a man and using your instincts and self-control to conceal your fear and adrenaline. Of course, I can still find a game like that, but not here - it needs to be with humans, around a card table. The online game is dead: by its very nature, it is wide open to cheats and colluders. The sooner we realise that we don't know who or how many people we're really playing, the better.

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You'll never beat poker robots
By This Is Money
Last updated at 11:57 AM on 4th March 2009
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The time is 5am. A watery dawn light is bringing a new day into my study; I'm reaching the weary end of a bottle of brandy and a gruelling six-hour internet session on Paradisepoker.com. And I've just haemorrhaged a packet.
 
Game's up? Most players are habitual losers called 'fish' but would they still play if they knew they couldn't win?
It all started so well. I broke even for the first few hours. But since 2am, I've lost £670. They say you should never play poker with any more money than you can afford to take to the bottom of your garden and burn; I can't afford to burn £670.
So now I'm playing like a wild man, trying to claw some funds back. I no longer care about odds or stats; I just want to play every pot, regardless of my cards, and I'm paying out money like a broken fruit machine as a consequence. It's what is known in the trade as 'playing on tilt' - emotion, not logic, is the driver. I'm every poker player's dream opponent.
My sleepless, ruinous night should be music to the ears of the billion-pound online poker industry - after all, the more I play, the more they make in commission. But, as I am about to discover, these poker giants are sleeping even worse than me.
Because the computers they rely on to coin them their fortunes are being turned against them. And it could cost them their entire empires.
How poker robots work
To explain why, we must fast-forward 24 hours after my marathon poker disaster. Because now I've made a new friend to help me with my online poker, and he's making me decent money - at five tables simultaneously. So far we're averaging £20 profit an hour - and my friend doesn't take breaks. He'll go on playing forever, he'll never flag or make a wrong call and he won't become depressed or euphoric. This is because he is, of course, a computer.
It's very simple, it's legal and no one on the other side of the screen will ever know. I've run a cable from the PC showing the game - or, rather, games - into a laptop running some specialist poker software.
This displays an information-only Etch A Sketch-like rendering of the poker tables; the cards, the betting, the players contending the pot. The laptop is making millions of different computations based upon the strength of my hand and how the others are betting. Then it places 'my' bet. I don't have to lift a finger or even be in the room.
If you're a poker player, this is merely unethical. But if you're an executive or shareholder in one of the top poker websites, the advent of programs that play for you is very bad news indeed.
Online poker is a £3bn-a-year industry - £3m is gambled on online poker every day in Britain alone (we're now the fifth biggest gambling country in the world). But this depends on the punters knowing they're getting a fair game. When they're up against expertly programmed computer players, then they are, quite emphatically, not.
And if these programs evolve as fast as the experts predict, online poker is nothing more than a busted flush.
________________________________________
This story first appeared in the Mail on Sunday's magazine, Night & Day Live.
To arrange home delivery of the paper visit www.mailonsunday.co.uk
________________________________________
You can't beat poker robots
One expert in this powerful new software, 'Chopper', tells me, 'It's amazing to think of how much we gamble on online poker sites - mainly because there is no such thing as a fair game of online poker. It just doesn't exist.
The game is completely corrupt; it has zero integrity. Online players are secretly using every means at their disposal to fleece you - and at the forefront of their campaign is the use of poker robots. When all this becomes public knowledge, the amateurs will leave and the game will die.'
Ten years ago, poker in general was nowhere. Now it's huge. In August this year, poker tournaments were broadcast on nine separate UK TV channels. Organisations such as the World Poker Tour have shaped the game into a small-screen adrenaline hit; there's even been a poker storyline on The Archers.
 
Online poker has ridden on the back of poker's new appeal to become the internet success story. It's easy to join in - you sign on to a site such as 888.com or Party Poker, submit your credit card number and start to play on a 'table' showing yourself and your opponents. Only you can see your own cards, of course; everyone can see the five shared cards that feature in the most popular poker variation, Texas Hold 'Em, and with which you make your strongest five-card hand.
All those who are still 'in' at the end of the last betting round have their cards revealed, and the computer flags up the winner, adjusting everyone's cash totals accordingly.
As well as winning on the night, if you're good and lucky you can also win entry to high-rolling tournaments associated with the website; all of which explains why American-owned Paradise Poker's average daily profit in one month earlier this year was £169,000.
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Are you a poker fish?
Of course, what the huge billboards dotting the country don't tell you is that an astonishing 90 per cent of online players are habitual losers. They're known as 'fish'. These inexperienced players have very little grasp of odds or strategy and might as well bet on raindrops rolling down a window. But the credit card deposits they make are the lifeblood of the new poker boom. They trickle down to the huge TV pots that ultimately draw in shoals of new fish.
What is crucial for the boom to continue is that these fish think there's no cheating. In the beginning of online gaming, the big and obvious worry was collusion - groups of supposed strangers in fact conferring by phone.
It's impossible to win against such a group, because when you get a strong hand, you don't rake in as much as you should to cover the losses from all your weak hands, since your opponents will work out who among them has the strongest hand and the rest will fold. But the websites stopped this - terrified that their cash cows would falter under this threat, they spent millions creating software to automatically monitor patterns of play and sniff out these collaborators.
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The poker robot runner
Which is where the poker programs - or poker bots - came in. From a tiny start, they're creeping into games everywhere. Of course, the whole point is that it is impossible to quantify exactly how widespread they are, but those in the know say you could quite easily expect all the other 'players' at a typical table to be computers - in which case, if you are anything other than a very capable player you can surely only lose.
Take 'Dave' ('bot-running' isn't illegal, but like other bot-runners he wants to keep his identity concealed from the casinos). He is a British computer programmer whose bots have played some 300,000 online rounds. He was approached a year ago by a syndicate of pro poker players eager to build a bot to take advantage of the new money pouring into online poker.
He says, 'I'm doing pretty well. I have two computer systems, and each one can run four poker bots, and each of those four can play up to five tables at once. At worst I make on average £2.90 an hour at each table. That's a minimum of £116 an hour if I can get all the bots running at once.
'Right now I'm working on getting two bots at a table card-sharing, but cleverly so they can't be detected.
Ultimately we'll get to a stage where if you want to win anything, you're going to have to use some kind of poker bot just to keep you in the game.'
 
Ray Bornert II is the creator of the WinHoldEm software that is the most popular of these intelligent poker bots. Bornert began work on his card-beating program shortly after approaching casino companies as a security consultant. 'When I realised that profiling - that's the software that tracks the performance of all online players - could be successfully eliminated, but that bots could not, my entire world changed almost overnight.'
Bornert harbours an almost evangelical belief that online poker is institutionally corrupt. 'The sites are helpless. It's obvious - casinos cannot control what a human player does with the game information once it graphically arrives on his or her screen. A player typically has 30 to 60 seconds to make a decision when their turn arrives. Think of what a computer can achieve in five seconds, let alone a minute. And that's the casinos' problem. People want to play against humans that have weaknesses, not robots. They won't stand for it.'
What is a bot?
A piece of automated software. Bots conduct millions of transactions daily on the world's stock exchanges.
What does a poker bot do?
It plays online poker for you by scanning casino software on your first computer and playing your hands for you. Having run through millions of scenarios involving your hand, it will decide whether the bet is worth calling or raising. It does this based on the strength of the hand, your betting position, the size of the pot and the number of players contending it. Due to advances in programming you now only need one computer, rather than the two. The programmers have learnt to change the name of the robot file to look as if it is part of the windows application, thus making impossible for online casino / poker site to detect.
Does it work off the shelf?
Yes, but it won't make you any money. The program is a virtually blank slate that you fill with as many scenarios as you see fit. You'll need to spend about 2,500 hours programming it to turn even a profit.

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Bots, Cheating, and Online Poker
Posted on Sun Dec 10, 2006 03:11:18 PM
Filed under Articles, Free Articles, Internet Poker

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Recently, a long-time member of the Las Vegas poker community posted a question in several public forums about cheating. He saw a Google ad on my site for an organization selling some “Cheating” software for poker.
I saw those ads too, and I submitted them immediately to Google so that they wouldn’t display. Google selects the ads to display, but I can veto them manually, and I vetoed the cheating ones. Normally I have a laissez faire attitude toward ads, figuring that my readers are smart enough to know what might be worth buying (poker equipment, books, and other stuff) and what’s a dud. But I won’t have “Cheat at Poker” spashed across my site, whether the guy is selling snake oil or not.
The post then asks what cheating methods might be used online, and what he should be concerned about. I don’t want to alarm people, but I think it’s a valid question, so I figured I’d talk a bit about it. There are two major classes of cheating threats: attacks on the basic integrity of the game, and team play.
Attacks on the Integrity of the Game
I’m talking about stuff like the cards being “rigged,” about some players being able to see others’ hands, and about people being able to crack the random number generator (RNG).
To be hit by one of these things requires either incompetent software design, deliberate misuse by someone on the inside, or spyware.
At the 30,000 foot level, here’s how a poker program “should” work. It should use a hardware RNG to ensure true randomness rather than pseudo-randomness. Computers often generate “random” numbers by taking a fixed seed (like the current time) and running it through a very unpredictable function. This makes the output seem random, but if you know the original seed number, you can just run the function again and predict what the “random” number will be.
Hardware RNG is truly random. An example is a radioactive source and a Geiger counter. You can’t predict when the next atom will decay, when the Geiger counter will next “blip.” No one can. It’s a law of nature. You can use the random blips of a Geiger counter to generate truly random, unpredictable numbers.
Poker software should generate your hole cards with hardware RNG. Then it should send them to you through an encrypted channel. It would work similarly to the encryption on the web. Here’s how it might work. Your computer selects a secret key (i.e., password) at random (or, rather, psuedo-random). It encrypts it using the poker site’s public key and sends it to the site. The site decrypts the key and then sends you a confirmation that you both have the same key. Then the site communicates your cards to you using your agreed upon secret key.
If done correctly, no one “listening in” can know what your cards are. It’s a secret between you and the poker site. That’s how a poker site should work, and it’s relatively basic stuff for any competent developer. The casino sites use hardware RNG, thus relying on psuedo-random numbers. Since those numbers can be predicted, one could “crack” the code and figure out what all the cards are.
The site could also mis-implement the encryption algorithm and introduce a vulnerability there. Fortunately, online poker sites seem to be settling on a few online poker software packages rather than developing new ones for each little site..
As I said, your cards are a secret between you and the poker site. Or rather, between your computer and the poker site’s computer. Those are the two points of attack. If someone at the poker site who has access to the server code wanted to look at cards, they could, without question, do so. There’s no way around that. This cracking of the could also be used on blackjack tables etc.
Team Play
Team play is a more imminent threat. Obviously, colluding is trivial. Talk to someone else while you play. It’s a skill, though… two idiots who can’t play poker aren’t a threat. But two excellent players who have mastered colluding will be damn near unbeatable.
Identifying collusion is tricky. There’s ways sites can do it, but a lot of the evidence is circumstantial, and it requires human eyes to make the final call. Whenever you have a network-scale problem and a human-scale solution, stuff will slip through the cracks. Especially when the problem users are largely anonymous and can just change IP’s, bank accounts, and usernames and start again.
To me, the most direct threat to online poker is colluding bots. By themselves, bots are a major threat to online poker. Bot software is now available to the public
The reason bots are a threat is because it’s not too hard to code a bot that will beat the small games, both limit and no limit. Small games are the lifeblood of the poker economy and the $100 losses at $2-$4 are ultimately what feed the $1,000-$2,000 games at the top – pyramid style. In a normal small stakes game, incompetent players fill most of the seats, and the few good players “shear the sheep,” as it were, taking their cut, but leaving most of the money floating around.
Bots, however, have the capability to be in hundreds of games simultaneously. Eventually they will “skin the sheep.” They will continue to expand and fill seats until someone stops them, or until it’s no longer profitable. If the bots are making no money, then it means the cardroom is getting its rake, the good players are getting a tiny bit, and the bad players are getting slaughtered. They’ll quit. And without their money, the whole online poker pyramid will collapse.
Bots are quite literally the cancer of online poker. They will multiply until they have killed their victim or until someone contains them. The bot software I linked above allows users to create their own AI and plug it into the bot framework. Hundreds of great poker minds are working right now to develop better AIs. If you want insight into their brains, again, read those forums.
More threatening still is colluding bots. Bots can communicate with other bots and share hole cards. Say someone writes a colluding bot and sits it in three seats of a game. The bots share hole cards with each other and instantly adjust their strategies based on the extra knowledge. A well-coded bot of this type would be extremely formidable even to strong players.
Unfortunately, as I gaze into my crystal ball, I fear colluding bots may make online poker in 2010 just a shell of what it is today. As someone who makes his living off the vibrancy of honest poker, that thought scares me a lot. But just because I want the problem to go away doesn’t mean it will. You, every honest poker player, should know what the threats are and exactly what you might be up against when you play online poker.
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Tags: bots, captchas, cheating, collusion, hardware-rng, Internet Poker, keylogger, online-poker, party-poker, poker, poker-ai, poker-bots, poker-cheating, pokerstars, pseudo-random, random-number-generator, rng, screen-scraper, spyware, two-plus-two, twoplustwo
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You can make money with Casino robots at Blackjack
First of all, let me clarify the myths and facts about casino bots. Bots are samples of software which you can employ to understand the cards put on view at online casinos and settle on the best approach to play. They are absolutely lawful to use, subject obviously to online casino gaming being permissible in your country. As with any software, they are merely as competent as the acumen programmed into them.
A game like poker is so Byzantine that it’s very hard to create an unbeatable poker bot. Blackjack is far more trouble-free and this is where software actually can assist – yes it is achievable to earn money with a blackjack bot. we need to understand how do blackjack bots operate. They will interpret the cards you are dealt and the exhibited dealer card and settle on the statistically approved method to play. Primitive bots merely recommended you to Hit, Stand, Double etc but the new superior bots are capable of in fact making the plays for you. You can blatantly log into your casino account, trigger the bot and depart and do your other jobs even as your bot plays faultless tactical blackjack!
One blackjack software out there calls and tells you whether you will win or lose the next hand, it is not a bot as you are still in total control of the game. The difference is that this software seems to be able to read the blackjack tables! Yes we have heard about software like this but not one that is coming to the mass market. I say mass market with packages starting for around $3000.00 it could be out of the reach of most? A UK company they still have a good product.
There are many casinos that are keen to register fresh players and several prospects to earn money with your blackjack bot.
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johnnyawe
 09-20-2004, 08:46 PM Post subject: winholdem poker bot  #1 (permalink)


 
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,064
 
 There is this program called winholdem.

Two features intrigued/alarmed me:

1) Auto-play

"WH has the ability to play Hold'Em for you and in fact it probably plays Hold'Em better than you."

2) Card sharing:

"One of the most exciting WH features is the ability to easily and conveniently share your cards with a fellow friend playing Hold'Em at the same online poker casino table."


Any thoughts on the prevelance of software like this and whether it poses a threat to the integrity of the online game? Any thoughts on how well the autoplay feature would work? Do you think anybody uses these features? Do you think people could make a profit by using autoplay? Is there any way to determine if somebody is using autoplay and if so could you easily defeat it?
 
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Deadmoney
 09-20-2004, 11:14 PM  #2 (permalink)

 

Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 21
 
 Wow...

I don't know if/how well it would work, but that's just wrong IMO. I can understand cheats for video games and such, but people play online poker with their own hard-earned money, and putting anyone at an unfair disadvantage like that (if the program is as good as they say it is) is no better than walking up to them on the street and stealing their wallet.

The people that wrote that program, and anyone who uses it to turn a profit, should be ashamed of themselves.
 
mpqz
 09-21-2004, 08:05 AM  #3 (permalink)

 

Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 19
 
 It sounds like the program just calculates your outs, the pot size, and figures out the best +EV play, and executes it... (I didn't read about it yet)

I think this is dangerous (in limit games) but not a real threat. It would be no different than playing someone who is really a great player (always making +EV moves, because he's looking to win in the long run).

It's unfair yes (bots don't go on tilt and they can multi-table 24/7 without ever stopping), but what can you do about it?

If party poker (using them as an example here) finds a way to detect it, surely the authors of this program (or anyone else who writes a program to do the same thing) will update their bot to counter act PP's detection.

That process would continue constantly, with no winner.

With people playing overseas with overseas transactions, I'm not sure if PP can do anything legally to stop each abusive user (I haven't read their TOS).
 
elipsesjeff
 09-21-2004, 05:14 PM  #4 (permalink)

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Issue 13.09 - September 2005
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On the Internet, Nobody Knows You're a Bot
In the booming world of online poker, anyone can win. Especially with an autoplaying robot ace in the hole. Are you in, human?
By David KushnerPage 1 of 2 next »
 
It's late one Wednesday afternoon, and CptPokr is logged on to PartyPoker.com and ready to play. Onscreen, the captain exudes a certain brash charisma - broad shoulders, immaculate brown hair, restless animatronic eyes. He looks like he should be playing synth in Kraftwerk. Instead, he is seated at a virtual table with nine other avatars, wagering on limit Texas hold 'em.
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There's plenty at stake. An estimated 1.8 million gamblers around the world ante up for online poker every month. Last year, poker sites raked in an estimated $1.4 billion, an amount expected to double in 2005.
Ever since the aptly named accountant Chris Moneymaker parlayed a $40 Internet tournament buy-in into a $2.5 million championship at the World Series of Poker in 2003, card shark wannabes have been chasing their fantasies onto the Net. Some even quit their day jobs and try to make a living at online poker. And why not? This shadowy world is driven by no less a force than the great American dream. As the tournament's motto goes, "Anyone can win." There's one problem, though, as CptPokr is about to demonstrate: The rules of the game are different online.
CptPokr is a robot. Unlike the other icons at the table, there is no human placing his bets and playing his cards. He is controlled by WinHoldEm, the first commercially available autoplaying poker software. Seat him at the table and he will apply strategy gleaned from decades of research. While carbon-based players munch Ding Dongs, yawn, guzzle beer, reply to email, take phone calls, and chat on IM, CptPokr (a pseudonym) is running the numbers so it will know, statistically, when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em.
Smart, skilled players are rewarded in the long run, especially online, where there are plenty of beginners who would never have the nerve to sit down at a real table. But WinHoldEm isn't just smart, it's a machine. Set it to run on autopilot and it wins real money while you sleep. Flick on Team mode and you can collude with other humans running WinHoldEm at the table.
For years, there has been chatter among online players about the coming poker bot infestation. WinHoldEm is turning those rumours into reality, and that is a serious problem for the online gambling business. Players come online seeking a "fair" shot - a contest against other humans, not robots. But an invasion of bots implies a fixed game (even though, like their mortal counterparts, they can and do lose if their hands are bad enough or opponents good enough). So the poker sites loudly proclaim that automated play is no big deal. At the same time, they are fighting back by quietly scanning for and eliminating suspicious accounts. "We're making sure we never have bots on our site," says PartyPoker marketing director Vikrant Bhargava.
That's an impossible promise to keep, says Ray E. Bornert II, WinHoldEm's elusive creator. He's trying to flood the online world with his bot - and make a killing in the process. Bornert offers an elaborate justification for what many view as outright cheating: Online poker is already rife with computer-assisted card sharks and - thanks to him - a growing number of outright bots. Players should get wise and arm themselves with the best bot available, which is, of course, WinHoldEm.
There's a quiet knock at the door of a hotel room in Atlanta. It's Bornert. A stocky, wide-faced 43-year-old with a neat goatee and nervous manner, he's carrying a router in a plastic bag. To demonstrate his software, he insists on meeting here in private, several miles from his office. He doesn't want anyone from the poker business to know where he is. "Our guard is constantly up," he says.
For Bornert, a former evangelical student, outsmarting the poker sites is not just a mission, it's a market. A suite of WinHoldEm programs is available for download at www.winholdem.net. For $25, you get a bare-bones setup: run-of-the-mill poker-hand analysis software. For $200, you can buy the full package: a one-year subscription to the team edition, which includes the autoplaying bot and a card-sharing module that allows multiple players to communicate during a game. Bornert won't say how many customers he has; he'll admit only that he makes a living selling WinHoldEm.
For customers, buying the bot is just a starting point. The program works something like a music equalizer, but instead of adjusting bass and treble, you tweak betting strategies - how to play a pair of fives early in the game, for example, or when to fold cards that might look promising to a beginner. Most users customize the software by inputting a batch of rules, called a formula set. Bot aficionados scour poker manuals and online forums to cull the best strategies. They swap formula sets like gamers swap mods. "This is from Sklansky's Tournament Poker for Advanced Players, pages 122-133," reads a typical note posted to the WinHoldEm forums.
Bornert isn't claiming he can create millionaires. Bots are subject to the same cold streaks as real players. But, unlike humans, the machines play with relentless cunning and tireless discipline, raking in small pots from low-limit tables where less-experienced opponents hang out. Traditionalists in the poker chat rooms scorn Bornert. "You are a pathetic immoral piece of shit loser," reads a recent post, "completely devoid of morals and ethics."
He hardly cares. Bornert insists that he's bringing to light the hypocrisy of the gambling sites. It's an unlikely role for a guy who grew up in Dallas and Phoenix as a self-described "geek jock" playing football and studying biblical history. "I'd always been taught gambling was evil," he says. He went on to Oral Roberts University, where he became fascinated with cards after seeing a late-night infomercial for a blackjack scheme.
Bornert was pursuing a degree in computer science, and the ad intrigued him. He set up some simulations to test the card-counting technique and found that a player could, in fact, get the edge. That's when a light went on: Blackjack wasn't really gambling after all. With enough smarts, a player could master it and win. "No one could say I was addicted to a losing game," Bornert says. "It was beatable." After seven consecutive profitable trips to Vegas, Bornert got hooked on winning.

As the poker boom hit the Net, Bornert found himself working for the house. He took a job as a senior systems engineer with RealTime Gaming, an Atlanta-based developer of online casino software. While working on blackjack software in 2001, he started tinkering with his own card-analysis software on the side. Such programs - Poker Tracker, Poker Edge, Holdem Winner - have since become an acceptable and indispensable part of the scene. They're used like calculators to keep tabs on shifting stats. It didn't take long for Bornert to make the next logical connection - what he calls the "golden goose" of online poker. Rather than consult card-analysis software while playing, why not hook up the software directly to the game?
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Bornert had no ethical qualms about creating a poker bot. The way he saw it, the poker sites were duping people into believing that a game of hold 'em online was as safe and secure as one at any casino in Vegas. "The reality is that the game changed the moment it moved to the Internet," Bornert says. Bots and bot-aided collusion were inevitable. Rather than seduce anyone into thinking such things didn't exist, Bornert had another notion: Put the power in the players' hands. By democratizing computer-assisted firepower, he'd make it part of the competition. "It's like football - if you don't wear a helmet and pads, you're going to get hurt," he says. "A poker bot is your equipment." And if that is considered unethical, then so be it. "I'd rather be unethical than be a victim," he says. "This is intentional civil disobedience."
In 2003, Bornert quit his job at RealTime Gaming and devoted himself to writing WinHoldEm. He quickly had a working prototype, which serves as the template for the bot he sells today. When a user boots up the software and logs on for a game, all the players' cards and chips are represented onscreen. WinHoldEm first scans the screen for information. The data is put into memory and analyzed according to the player's formula set. Each action - calling, raising, going all-in - is controlled by a series of yes-no formulas.
By fall, Bornert was ready to test his software. He logged on to a $5-limit hold 'em tournament on Paradise Poker and watched the program go. A crucial element of the test was to see how long the application could stay online without being detected. Eventually, Bornert went to bed - but the bot didn't. The next morning when he checked his computer, WinHoldEm had won. It wasn't a lot of money, only $30, but it proved a point. "I almost shed tears," he recalls. "I know what Dr. Frankenstein felt like. It was a totally intoxicating experience."
On Super Bowl Sunday 2004, Bornert began offering his program online. It didn't take long for the poker sites to catch on and fight back. Within weeks, they were scanning games to see if anyone was running WinHoldEm, and users were getting booted off poker sites before they could cash out. "Players no longer feel comfortable if they think they're playing a computer," says Scott Wilson, director of operations for Paradise Poker. "You would lose credibility fast if they felt your environment wasn't human-to-human."
Players themselves also took steps against the bots, using a site's chat function to smoke out the software. Moneymaker likes to engage players in small talk between hands. "Poker bots can't make conversation," he says. Meanwhile, bot users started developing their own counter-countermeasures, like limiting their time at any one table to minimize the appearance that a relentless machine is involved. And they can control their bots from a remote computer to evade detection by poker sites that scan for WinHoldEm on a hard drive.
The battle goes beyond Bornert's app. Other bots are appearing on the scene - including some that were never intended for online play. For the past 14 years, computer scientists at the University of Alberta Games Group have been building the poker version of Deep Blue: a program that can beat a top player, just as IBM's bot trumped Garry Kasparov in chess. "I'd love to be there when the computer raises the stakes by $100,000," says UA's Jonathan Schaeffer. "I want to see the bead of perspiration going down the human opponent's forehead. That's my dream."
There's reason to sweat even now. Not because Schaeffer's bot is taking on world champs - that's a few years off - but because bits of the underlying UA code have escaped into the wild. Schaeffer licensed his team's software to the makers of applications like Poker Academy, which trains players in the game's finer points. But hackers have extracted the underlying code and are putting it to use in their poker bots.
Poker site operators say there's nothing to worry about, and for them there isn't. For now, sites continue to earn healthy profits because they make money by taking a percentage - the "rake" - of every pot. "If anyone's losing money because of the bots, it's the players," says Poker Academy CEO Kurt Lange. "It's inevitably going to become a serious problem when they figure out that bots win hundreds of thousands of dollars per year." Indeed, PartyPoker reportedly has 100 employees scanning for the presence of bots.
PartyPoker's Bhargava insists that the game is still fair. "There are people who spend all their waking hours dreaming about how to bring us down," he says. "They can dream about creating fantasy bots that will play for them or make them money while they sleep, but that's not going to happen."
"All right, we're on!" says Bornert, as the two laptops in the hotel room fire up WinHoldEm and join a game of Texas hold 'em on none other than PartyPoker. "Awesome!"
As the bot folds onscreen, Bornert leans back in his chair and soaks it in. Though he's watched this scene countless times, he's still impressed with his own technology. He imagines a day when sites acknowledge the presence of bots and when players embrace them as part of the action. But this won't happen, he says, until players take up the cause. "You've been woken up," he says, as the bot rakes in its chips. "Now what are you going to do?" Bornert hopes they reach the obvious conclusion: Use a bot, too.
David Kushner ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) is the author of Jonny Magic and the Card Shark Kids.
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Designing a Robot to Beat Blackjack
8 March 2004

By John May
<a href='http://as1.casinocity.com/www/delivery/ck.php?n=aae8c64d&cb=0.631424346987' target='_blank'><img src='http://as1.casinocity.com/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=4&cb=0.631424346987&n=aae8c64d' border='0' alt='' /></a>
If there is one thing online casinos fear more than any other it is a blackjack robot player, a computer program designed to play blackjack perfectly and tirelessly. Simply mirroring a robot's tireless playing patterns is enough to get your account frozen and your winnings confiscated from some casinos who offer blackjack games that can theoretically be beaten by card counting.
They shouldn't worry. If I were running an online casino, I'd welcome play by blackjack robots. Hell, I'd have a competition to see who could design the best one. Programming a computer to play perfectly is quite easy. I could do it, and I'm no great shakes as a programmer. The difficulty comes with the "broken biscuit" principle. Programming a computer to recognize a biscuit is easy. It can just look at the shape and check it with its memory banks for a correlation with the known shape of a biscuit. If the biscuit is broken, however, the robot struggles. Unlike a human it can't process the colour, texture and smell of the biscuit to determine it is one.
The same problem occurs with card recognition. Explaining what a card is to a blackjack computer given the myriad number of possible designs is not easy. There is no margin of error here. If a computer thinks a 4 is an ace or vice versa it will blow your bankroll in minutes.
If I were running a casino, I could create the perfect countermeasure by designing the software to periodically alter the card design in some unnoticeable way every now and again. The human player wouldn't even notice but the computer would be hopelessly confused. To some extent this happens anyway because of small problems with PC display systems and internet transmission difficulties. Has your screen ever gone a funny colour when your computer crashed a program?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poker Bots
You either love em or you hate em. But lets face it, they are not gonna go away just yet. In fact they are getting better all the time. Just click on the links on the right if you want to review any or all of them. As they become available, we will do our best to find them and review them here. So why not pop back here from time to time, and catch up with the latest.
What Is a Poker Bot
A Poker bot, or Poker Robot, is a program or piece of software that is normally hooked up to an Online Poker Site, and makes decisions about the current hand that is being played, and acts accordingly (Bets, Folds, Raises etc), just as if you were playing the hand yourself.
I am sure a lot of you are at least curious about the latest craze in poker. We are of course referring to poker bots. Review and try
Before we start. We would like to make our position here at .Com perfectly clear with regards to Poker Bots, Poker Robots, or whatever else you would like to call them. We do not, and will not, condone any form of cheating whatsoever.
Winholdem
So, while we are on the subject of cheating, let us cover the first bot, that does exactly that. Now I am sure a few of you will already know the name of the program I'm talking about. "Winholdem". we will not endorse the use of it in any way. What this software allows you to do that we find so repulsive, is that it allows its owner to collude with other players online who are also in possession of this piece of kit. In other words, they disclose each other's cards. For those of you who do find the idea of cheating attractive, and are maybe tempted to rush off and obtain it from site, here are a few words of wisdom. You will not be purchasing an out of the box bot. You'll have to program it yourself, and will have to have a very good knowledge of C to do so. If you have this knowledge, you will have to spend hundreds if not thousands of hours trying to produce a workable bot. And all this for a bargain price of $200 PER ANNUM.
Online Pokibot
Well what has this to do with online poker bots? you may ask. The answer is that someone has attempted to make a program that allows these bots to be used online. and they call it, "Online Pokibot". Now I used the word attempted, because it is full of bugs and basically doesn't work. And for this piece of rubbish, you pay a whooping annual fee.
It all sounds very expensive, does it not? Well if you will keep reading a little longer we have a pleasant surprise for you.
BE WARNED! The support at this site will not reply to any of your e-mails when you query the many problems you will encounter. Neither will you receive a refund

 

 
 
 
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Your next poker partner may be software
Last updated 00:00 14/11/2007
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KNOW WHEN TO HOLD 'EM: Online poker is under threat from people developing sophisticated computer programs that can easily outplay the best players.
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The lucrative world of online poker has been put on notice as researchers edge closer to developing software that can outplay even the most skilful humans.
The research poses a significant threat to the multi-billion dollar online poker industry and players, who down the track risk being fleeced by legions of robot-aided scammers.
Computer programs can already beat most humans at checkers, backgammon, scrabble, bridge and connect four.
A decade ago, an IBM super computer famously beat the former World Chess Champion, Garry Kasparov, in a six-game duel.
But the huge amount of money changing hands in online poker games - $US60 billion ($NZ79 billion) in 2005, according to some estimates - gives hackers a particular incentive to cheat the system.
In an opinion column for The New York Times, Ian Ayres, an economist and lawyer at Yale, said that, in the very near future, "online poker may become a suckers' game that humans won't have a chance to win".
In July this year, two of the world's best poker players only narrowly beat a computer program at Texas Hold 'Em during the first Man-Machine Poker Championship in Vancouver, Canada.
The program, Polaris, was developed over 16 years by the computer poker research group at the University of Alberta. It incorporates a number of fixed strategies but can also adapt based on moves and mistakes made by the opponent.
"We won, not by a significant amount, and the bots are closing in," one of the world champion players, Phil Laak, told The Guardian after the match.
Other poker-playing computer bots, such as Bluffbot and WinHoldem, can already be downloaded from the internet but their accuracy and effectiveness when put up against the world's best players has been questioned.
Professor Jonathan Schaeffer, who co-founded the Alberta university's poker research group, said the team was already working on programs that could take on multiple players in both limit and no-limit games.
His group had already "solved" checkers earlier this year, developing a computer program that knew the best move to make in any possible position.
"All games lead to a draw, unless one side makes a mistake," Dr Schaeffer said.
Polaris is today only strong at two-player Texas Hold 'Em games that have a limit on the amount players can bet.
"Building a program that plays on par with the top human players in this domain is something that will happen fairly soon, perhaps even next year," he said.
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The goal of the poker research group, as outlined on its website, is to "produce a poker program that is stronger than all human players".
But despite the rapid progress, Dr Schaeffer stressed it could be a while before computer programs could seriously challenge the top humans in no-limit games and games with three or more people at a table.
He denied the university's research posed a significant threat to online poker sites, saying the sites would "do everything in their power" to block players from using software programs to play for them.
"All these sites have programs that look for evidence that a computer is playing instead of a human," Dr Schaeffer.
But Dr Ayres said computer bots such as Polaris were "quite-scaleable", and it would be virtually impossible to prohibit computer-assisted playing.
He said bots could randomise their moves to make them harder to detect.
Australian laws prohibit companies from offering online casino-style gambling services here, but the laws have done nothing to stop swarms of Australians from betting through sites based overseas. This year, an employee of one site, AbsolutePoker.com, was caught cheating.
- Sydney Morning Herald                            Technology Homepage
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Blackjack Bots
Several casino players who play blackjack online fear that they might be playing against a blackjack bot or a robot which can steal their money. Blackjack Bots are basically software which can be used in order to read the cards which are on display at the online casinos. Using bots, the player can decide the best action for that hand.
These bots are definitely quite prevalent and are also used and designed by players quite often for cheating at blackjack. Like with any other type of software, bots would only be as useful as the intelligence with which they have been made.
What Can a Bot do?
1. A good bot in blackjack would work just like the brain of a skilled blackjack player. It would take the player's cards as an input would plug the cards in the matrix for the basic strategy and would then decide how to play those cards in the best possible way.
2. A good bot would also know when to split, double and hit. If the bot is really good it would be able to make totally error free decisions.
3. A good blackjack bot would be able to take the game structure for every online casino in account. The player can input the bet amounts, the dealer parameters and the number of decks which are used.
The basic strategy would be adjusted automatically to maximize the profits for that game. Basically, a player can just turn on the bot and go off to sleep while the bot would play the game for the player perfectly and would continue to make money.
Blackjack bots do exist and they also work quite well. Lots of online players have figured out how to make blackjack bots and are also using it to make money at online casinos.

 

 

 


 
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Video-poker bots collaborate through back-channels
BY CORY DOCTOROW AT 8:08 AM THURSDAY, SEP 1
There's a fascinating piece in this month's Wired about a pokerbot called WinHoldEm, a commercial app that automatically plays through hand after hand of video poker, adhering to a strict system and even opening a back-channel to other WinHoldEm bots in the game to collude to bilk the human players out of their bets:
For years, there has been chatter among online players about the coming poker bot infestation. WinHoldEm is turning those rumours into reality, and that is a serious problem for the online gambling business. Players come online seeking a "fair" shot - a contest against other humans, not robots. But an invasion of bots implies a fixed game (even though, like their mortal counterparts, they can and do lose if their hands are bad enough or opponents good enough). So the poker sites loudly proclaim that automated play is no big deal. At the same time, they are fighting back by quietly scanning for and eliminating suspicious accounts. "We're making sure we never have bots on our site," says PartyPoker marketing director Vikrant Bhargava.
That's an impossible promise to keep, says Ray E. Bornert II, WinHoldEm's elusive creator. He's trying to flood the online world with his bot - and make a killing in the process. Bornert offers an elaborate justification for what many view as outright cheating: Online poker is already rife with computer-assisted card sharks and - thanks to him - a growing number of outright bots. Players should get wise and arm themselves with the best bot available, which is, of course, WinHoldEm
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A Poker bot, or Poker Robot, was programmed to do all the earning and playing for the programmer, they are hooked up to an Online Poker Site, and makes decisions about the current hand that is being played, and acts accordingly as if you were the one making all the decisions yourself. They seem to be all over the internet and taking over the internet casinos by the storms. Here is a little more information about different types of poker bots. Apparently they come programmed for different types of card games and tables.
The Shaky bots are near out of the box products open the box, tweak a few modifications to your playing preference and than they are on the loose winning you money while you sit back and watch. If you want something that is a little less cookie cutter; you may want to try a third party software program, like Online Poker Inspector, affectionately known as "OPI" among poker bot enthusiasts. The problem with these programs is that the decision-programming is limited to what these 3rd party software programs are capable of, so they are markedly inferior to a bot that was programmed up from scratch by a top player.
If you are one of the few out there who are already programmers, you will be happy with Win Holdem, a platform with a reworking bot which requires C/C++ programming knowledge. This allows you to do some custom work under the hood first. Although this is the more challenging of the options, you will have a great piece of work to put to the test when you are complete, and will have a great product to show off at the tables.
There are different levels of poker bots out there and it seems there are some sites that are a little less than honest or rewarding to go with. Stay away from any site that offers free bots, in exchange for their offers or services. Often times, these are not legitimate sites. And are scam artists. Online you can find several different places to download them and they do not require any programming at all. Entering a little information about the kind of poker bot you are going to use, than you are off, and playing. Or rather, your poker bot is. There are different programs for each table, and each and every type of poker game out there. Running a search engine on poker robots will give you a better idea of how many people are already taking advantage of this new and upcoming trend. You will not be the only person with a poker bot at your seat.
The purpose of the poker bot is to increase revenue and winnings without you having to physically be sitting at a poker table and playing the hands yourself. It allows you to dominate the power play of the game, and the tables. This has advantages and disadvantages. It is wise, and suggestive that you do plenty of research on any programming you are considering using, and only use trustworthy sites. And play smart.

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My husband and 6 children and myself live in Missouri. Our Children range from high school down to one still at home. We belong to a family church called Family Life Fellowship, my husband works for the Sher... View profile
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There is a new menace for the online casinos, they are called blackjack robots.
Unlike online poker where you are playing against other members of the public, with online blackjack you are playing usually against the dealer (or casino) Some blackjack robots are automatic and play the game for you. These are programmed to play the percentages and play a good game for you. The only problem I could see with these robot are you still in the hands of fate, you could walk away from the table leaving your blackjack robot to play and come back and you have lost everything! Unlike some poker robot which when running is playing against other humans. The blackjack robot is playing against the casinos blackjack dealers, which is in fact a computer program, who are programmed to make sure it comes out on top. I am not saying blackjack robots cannot win, just it is not in their hands.
There are different blackjack robot software’s out there on the market. As mentioned some play the game for you, some work out the percentages on each hand and calculate the percentage play. There is one out  there that is not really as blackjack robot, unlike the auto robots you still have to play the game for yourself, the (big) difference is it talks to you, telling you what the outcome of that game will be (win or lose) before the hand is dealt!
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The advantage of this software is that it can maximise your winnings and reduce your losses to the bare minimum. It is called read and voice blackjack software.
When we ran a test, it worked well (but only for 15 Min’s or so, as it has a time limiter to stop overuse) The test showed it wins on average six time the starting pot within the  time they allow you to use the software per day. (i.e.: £100 start of bank equates to £700, leaving approx £600 profit) It is very simple software to use.  The developers say that the software can be used at any blackjack table and is 100% undetectable, safe and legal. How do they do it? Well there not going to tell us, there are all sort of theories how they have cracked this tables. One that they have inside knowledge on how these casino programs work and how to break the code sent from the casino to the laptop, thus allowing their software to know the outcome before hand? To be honest it is all above our heads!
 
 

Yes this software does have a lot going for it, but also a big minus as far as we can see. What if you win too much too often? You account would be suspended and you would end up with nothing. Then the end game would be like some poker robot users who were too greedy and ended up with nothing. You would have to be very much disciplined with this software, varying your daily amounts, playing different sites and even making sure you lose on occasions. I suspect that this software will not be cheap to buy, but at least it works. They also have a very basic demo film of this software in action.
DatingWine ShopBingo
Everyone probably played blackjack as a kid as it is quick to pick up, you may know it as 21s. There are a couple of good blackjack books to read, one by Don Schlesinger is called “Blackjack attack – play the pro’s way” “Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M.I.T. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions” is the story of how the M.I.T team used card counting to make millions, the author is Ben Hezrich and is a good read. How long before blackjack robots are as big as poker robots, I suspect sooner rather than later?
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Disclaimer:   The information on this website is for entertainment purposes only and is not to be taken as financial advice. Although we believe the math is correct, it could be wrong and/or out of date. Variance plays a significant role in online gambling and results will vary widely from person to person. Any results or potential earnings mentioned here are not typical. Luck is a factor so pursue the contents of this website at your own risk. Online gambling may not be legal where you live so please check with your local laws. This website is in no way affiliated with any of the casinos or poker rooms that our products support. Using our software may be against the Terms and Service of the online gaming sites we support and you bear the sole responsibility for potential loss of funds, be it from gambling losses or from account seizure by the gaming site that you use our software at. Under no circumstances will we reimburse you for any lost funds. Our software comes with a free demo period and all license sales are final.